IBM Working on Web-based “Radiology Theater”


During an event called “Smarter Web Open House,” IBM said that it is working with Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston to create a web-based, collaborative environment for medical professionals to interact with each other and review radiology images, ECGs, etc. The system is based on a project at IBM dubbed Blue Spruce, a fully browser based development platform. The technology would allow clinicians to interact through video as well as a white-board environment.

From Information Week

The secure Web site that IBM created allows CT scans, MRIs, EKGs, and other medical data to be posted and analyzed using live videoconferencing and whiteboard capabilities. It requires no special software beyond a Web browser and can thus be accessed from a laptop or mobile device, as well as a desktop computer.

“The magic here is the integration of all these things in one place,” said David Boloker, CTO of IBM’s emergent Internet technology software group, who demonstrated the system.

And the difficulty is how the application, referred to as Blue Spruce, handles the policy issues surrounding the sharing of regulated health data. Those details are still being worked out, as is the Web technology upon which the Blue Spruce mashup platform relies.

 

More from Information Week

Blurb from the IBM Press Room…

 

Sourc Medgadget (http://www.medgadget.com/archives/2009/03/ibm_working_on_webbased_radiology_theater.html)

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International Brain Mapping Foundation

Crossing Disciplines to Prepare for the Future
color color The Board of Directors of the International Brain Mapping Foundation invites you to present your latest research at this CME credited multidisciplinary clinical and basic science research forum.

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION DEADLINE
Submit abstracts by April 30, 2009

Abstracts currently invited on: Nuclear Medicine | Functional MRI, MR Spectroscopy, CT | Nanomedicine/nanotechnology | Prosthetics | Brain Implants | Epilepsy | Neurodegenerative Diseases | NeuroOncology | Psychiatry | Spinal Disorders | Stem Cells | Biophotonics | Bioethics | Biomedical Engineering | Neuroimmunology | Neurophysiology | Ultrasound | Health IT | Healthcare Policy
View more topics…

Scope and topics
Location
Accommodation
Registration Information
Dates & Deadlines
Congress News
CME Accreditation

THE ORGANIZERS

The 6th Annual World Congress for Brain Mapping and Image Guided Therapy is organized by the International Brain Mapping and Intraoperative Surgical Planning Society color. Congress administration is provided by Elsevier color, publisher of NeuroImage – the official journal of the Society.

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE
Babak Kateb Chairman of the Board of Directors; Brain Mapping Foundation, Scientific Director of IBMISPS and Brain Mapping Foundation; Founding Chairman of the Board and Executive Director of IBMISPS; Managing Editor IBMISPS-NeuroImage, USA

Ferenc A. Jolesz B.Leonard Holman Professor of Radiology; Director, Division of MRI and National Center for Image Guided Therapy Department of Radiology Brigham and Women’s Hospital Harvard Medical School, USA

Shouleh Nikzad Lead, Advanced Detector Array and Nanoscience Group; Principal Member of Staff Lead, Strategic Initiative, Gigapixel FPAs NASA/JPL, California Institute of Technology; Visiting Research Associate Professor of Neurosurgery, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, USA

Warren S. Grundfest Professor of Bioengineering & Electrical Engineering; The Henry Samueli School of Engineering & Applied Science; Professor of Surgery; David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, USA

CONFERENCE SECRETARIAT

Richard Hart
IBMISPS Annual Congress 2009
Tel: +44 (0) 1460 259776
Fax: +44 (0) 1460 258783
Email Congress Secretariat

EXHIBITION AND SPONSORSHIP

A range of exhibiting and sponsorship opportunities are available to organizations wishing to support the congress. For further information and to book please contact:

Daniela Georgescu
Tel: +31 20 485 2611
Email: d.georgescu@elsevier.com

LOCATION AND DATES

August 26-29, 2009
Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA

NEW!
IBMISPS 2009 BEACON OF COURAGE AND DEDICATION AWRD

The 2009 IBMISPS Beacon of Courage and Dedication will be awarded to Bob Woodruff, ABC News Anchorman and Founder of the Remind Foundation. Bob will also give a Keynote Lecture at the Congress.

More awards…

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Admiral Mike Mullen
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Principal military advisor to the President, the Secretary of Defense, the National Security Council, and the Homeland Security Council

Michael S. Jaffee MD, FS, USAF
National Director, Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, USA

E. Melissa Kaime, MD
Captain, US Navy Medical Corps; Director, Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs, USA

Keith L. Black MD
Chairman, Dept. of Neurosurgery, Director, Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgery Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, USA
– Outsmarting Brain Tumors – from Nanodrugs to Optical Imaging
Peter M. Black MD PhD
Franc D. Ingraham Professor of Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, USA
– New Developments in Image-Guided Brain Tumor Therapy

Jim Cloar
Vice President & General Manager, Medtronic Navigation, USA

Sam Nazarian
Founding CEO and President of SBE Entertainment Group, USA

View invited session speakers…
CALL FOR PAPERS

The congress program will consist of invited lectures and presentations selected from submitted abstracts arranged within the following Scientific Sessions. Coverage will range from basic translational research and multidisciplinary clinical practice and surgery to healthcare policy and neuroeconomics.

Researchers are invited to submit 300-word abstracts for oral and poster presentations by April 30, 2009.color Scientific Sessions

Image guided therapy in brain
Operating room of the future
Convection-enhanced delivery
New horizons: Emerging technologies
Traumatic brain injury and PTSD
Neuro-physiology and brain mapping
Cellular imaging and biophotonics
Brain implants & the human brain-machine interface
Nanoscience, genomics, computational informatics genetics in brain mapping
Rehabilitation medicine: Stem cells
Vascular blood flow and stroke
Spine
Brain mapping in social sciences: NeuroEconomics and NeuroMarketing
Government research agencies
Brain mapping in stereotactic radiosurgery
Multi-modality imaging Submit abstracts here… color | View more topics here… CME ACCREDITATION

Kern Medical Center is accredited by the Institute for Medical Quality/California Medical Association (IMQ/CMA) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Kern Medical Center takes responsibility for the content, quality and scientific integrity of this CME activity. Kern Medical Center designates this educational activity for a maximum of 20 hour(s) AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s) 1tm. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. This credit may also be applied to the Certification in Continuing Medical Education.

CONGRESS VIDEOS

View Dustin Hoffman at the 2008 IBMISPS Congress

View the 2005 Welcome Address from the Honorable Senator Barbara Boxer

For full information visit http://www.ibmisps-worldcongress.org color

IBMISPS World Congress in the News: CNBC | Fox Business

SUPPORTING ORGANIZATIONS

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Fun with Math

See this,and think about…how wonderful Mathematics is…..

1 x 8 + 1 = 9

12 x 8 + 2 = 98

123 x 8 + 3 = 987

1234 x 8 + 4 = 9876

12345 x 8 + 5 = 98765

123456 x 8 + 6 = 987654

1234567 x 8 + 7 = 9876543

12345678 x 8 + 8 = 98765432

123456789 x 8 + 9 = 987654321

1 x 9 + 2 = 11

12 x 9 + 3 = 111

123 x 9 + 4 = 1111

1234 x 9 + 5 = 11111

12345 x 9 + 6 = 111111

123456 x 9 + 7 = 1111111

1234567 x 9 + 8 = 11111111

12345678 x 9 + 9 = 111111111

123456789 x 9 +10= 1111111111

9 x 9 + 7 = 88

98 x 9 + 6 = 888

987 x 9 + 5 = 8888

9876 x 9 + 4 = 88888

98765 x 9 + 3 = 888888

987654 x 9 + 2 = 8888888

9876543 x 9 + 1 = 88888888

98765432 x 9 + 0 = 888888888

 

Brilliant, isn’t it?

And finally, take a look at this symmetry:

1 x 1 = 1

11 x 11 = 121

111 x 111 = 12321

1111 x 1111 = 1234321

11111 x 11111 = 123454321

111111 x 111111 = 12345654321

1111111 x 1111111 = 1234567654321

11111111 x 11111111 = 123456787654321

111111111 x 111111111=12345678987654321

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Neuroimaging at 3T with Phoenix gallery

Magnetom World is a great source of information for MRI users they have always provided cutting edge techniques and resource for the community check them out.  Go to the  Phoenix  gallery for protocol help.  copy images right to your Siemens workstation.

Contrast Enhanced MR
Angiography (ce-MRA)
Superior gradient performance coupled with iPAT
parallel imaging allows ultrashort TR/TE exams
with high SNR. Siemens is a world leader in
gradient technology. This is of particular benefit
in angiographic applications in which the smallest
possible TE is desired to reduce spin dephasing
caused by field inhomogeneities and acceleration.
Routine Neuroimaging
The increased signal at 3 Tesla allows the
acquisition of ultra-fast neuro-anatomical images.
A 6 minute brain examination illustrates the point.
Contrast Enhanced MR
Angiography (ce-MRA)
Superior gradient performance coupled with iPAT
parallel imaging allows ultrashort TR/TE exams
with high SNR. Siemens is a world leader in
gradient technology. This is of particular benefit
in angiographic applications in which the smallest
possible TE is desired to reduce spin dephasing
caused by field inhomogeneities and acceleration.
MR Angiography
The routine 3D ToF MR angio sequence yields
excellent results with good visualization of secondary
and tertiary blood vessels. The increased T1 at 3T
also leads to improved background suppression in
time-of-flight techniques.
MRA of  Cerebral Arteries

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High field Extremity MRI

 

High Field (1.0 T) Extremity MRI
The dedicated extremity MR scanner at Mass General Imaging West, Waltham, is designed for
scanning the hand, wrist, elbow, foot, ankle, and knee
The diagnostic quality is comparable to 1.5 T conventional whole-body MR scanners
The maximum field of view of the extremity MR is 16 cm, which limits visualization of longitudinal
structures such as the quadriceps muscle and Achilles tendon
The bore size (18 cm) is too small for some applications (e.g. large knees) and is not suitable for
patients with leg or ankle casts or patients with limited flexibility
The 1.0 T MR dedicated extremity scanner (Figure 1),
installed at Mass General West Imaging, Waltham, is
designed to image the bones, joints, and soft tissues of
the hand, wrist (Figure 2), elbow, foot, ankle, and
knee. Because the joint of interest is centered in the
extremity scanner, it is always at the “sweet spot” of
the magnet, optimizing image quality, which is not
possible for elbow, wrist, or hand images in a
conventional whole-body MR scanner.
Images obtained with a 1.0 T MR extremity scanner are
generally regarded as comparable to those obtained in
a standard 1.5 T whole-body scanner, although there
are limited objective studies at this time. A
comparative study of patients with rheumatoid arthritis
showed excellent agreement between 1.5 T whole-body
MR and 1.0 T extremity MR in the scores for erosion,
synovitis, and bone marrow edema. Another study
compared accuracy and test-retest precision of
quantitative cartilage morphology in these two MR
systems and found no systematic bias between the
measurements of the cartilaginous surface of the
medial tibial plateau, the lateral tibial plateau, or the
central medial femoral condoyle. However, the study
revealed a statistically significant (P < 0.05) variation
of about 10% in cartilage volume (VC) and cartilage
thickness (ThCtAB) in the central lateral femoral
condyle.
Limitations
Although the large majority of patients can be scanned
with extremity MR, it is not suitable for all patients. The
bore size is 18 cm at its narrowest (Table 1), which
means that the scanner cannot be used for knee
imaging if the knee or distal thigh circumference is
greater than 22 1/4 inches (56.5 cm). Although casts
on wrists or arms are usually small enough to fit into
the magnet, a cast on the leg or ankle will not fit. In
addition, the patient must be able to flex his or her
ankle in order to pass the foot through the center of
F igure 1. The 1.0 T extremity MR scanner.
the bore. Therefore it is not possible to obtain images
of the knee if the patient has a cast on the ankle of the
same leg, and patients with limited ankle mobility may
find it difficult or impossible to insert their leg. Finally,
limited hip mobility can make it uncomfortable for a
patient to separate the legs sufficiently to place one leg
i n the magnet while the other rests on the floor.
The field of view of extremity MR can be no larger than
16 cm, which is smaller than a conventional scanner.
This means that the system truncates the visualization
of structures such as the quadriceps or Achilles tendon.
It is also not possible to view the entire hand or foot in
a single set of images. If the site of pain is localized to,
for example, the calcaneus region or the ball of the
foot, this is not a problem. However, the scanner is not
Figure 2. Images of the wrist obtained with the 1.0 T extremity scanner. (A) Axial image shows tendons and median nerve in
the carpal tunnel, (B) and (C) Coronal images showing scaphoid lesion (arrow). (D) Gadolinium contrast-enhanced image
excludes osteonecrosis.
suitable for diagnosis of patients with extensive tumor
involvement because it is necessary to visualize the
whole foot in these patients.
Procedure
Patients sit or recline on an ergonomically designed
chair, positioned so that the appropriate limb is
comfortably resting inside the bore of the extremity MR
scanner. Patients find the extremity MR scanner less
intimidating than a conventional MR scan because the
experience is not claustrophobic and the scanner is
relatively quiet. This sense of comfort helps patients
remain still and reduces problems due to motion
artifact. Therefore, it could be excellent for pediatric
patients. Scan duration is 30-35 minutes.

High Field (1.0 T) Extremity MRI

The dedicated extremity MR scanner at Mass General Imaging West, Waltham, is designed for

scanning the hand, wrist, elbow, foot, ankle, and knee

The diagnostic quality is comparable to 1.5 T conventional whole-body MR scanners

The maximum field of view of the extremity MR is 16 cm, which limits visualization of

longitudinal structures such as the quadriceps muscle and Achilles tendon

The bore size (18 cm) is too small for some applications (e.g. large knees) and is not suitable for

patients with leg or ankle casts or patients with limited flexibility

The 1.0 T MR dedicated extremity scanner (Figure 1),

installed at Mass General West Imaging, Waltham, is

designed to image the bones, joints, and soft tissues of

the hand, wrist (Figure 2), elbow, foot, ankle, and

knee. Because the joint of interest is centered in the

extremity scanner, it is always at the “sweet spot” of

the magnet, optimizing image quality, which is not

possible for elbow, wrist, or hand images in a

conventional whole-body MR scanner.

Images obtained with a 1.0 T MR extremity scanner are

generally regarded as comparable to those obtained in

a standard 1.5 T whole-body scanner, although there

are limited objective studies at this time. A

comparative study of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

showed excellent agreement between 1.5 T whole-body

MR and 1.0 T extremity MR in the scores for erosion,

synovitis, and bone marrow edema. Another study

compared accuracy and test-retest precision of

quantitative cartilage morphology in these two MR

systems and found no systematic bias between the

measurements of the cartilaginous surface of the

medial tibial plateau, the lateral tibial plateau, or the

central medial femoral condoyle. However, the study

revealed a statistically significant (P < 0.05) variation

of about 10% in cartilage volume (VC) and cartilage

thickness (ThCtAB) in the central lateral femoral

condyle.

Limitations

Although the large majority of patients can be scanned

with extremity MR, it is not suitable for all patients. The

bore size is 18 cm at its narrowest (Table 1), which

means that the scanner cannot be used for knee

imaging if the knee or distal thigh circumference is

greater than 22 1/4 inches (56.5 cm). Although casts

on wrists or arms are usually small enough to fit into

the magnet, a cast on the leg or ankle will not fit. In

addition, the patient must be able to flex his or her

ankle in order to pass the foot through the center of

F igure 1. The 1.0 T extremity MR scanner.

the bore. Therefore it is not possible to obtain images

of the knee if the patient has a cast on the ankle of the

same leg, and patients with limited ankle mobility may

find it difficult or impossible to insert their leg. Finally,

limited hip mobility can make it uncomfortable for a

patient to separate the legs sufficiently to place one leg

i n the magnet while the other rests on the floor.

The field of view of extremity MR can be no larger than

16 cm, which is smaller than a conventional scanner.

This means that the system truncates the visualization

of structures such as the quadriceps or Achilles tendon.

It is also not possible to view the entire hand or foot in

a single set of images. If the site of pain is localized to,

for example, the calcaneus region or the ball of the

foot, this is not a problem. However, the scanner is not

http://www.mghradrounds.org/clientuploads/may_2009/may_2009.pdf?PHPSESSID=532207e8d6c2f6cd9d54d62476893009


suitable for diagnosis of patients with extensive tumor

involvement because it is necessary to visualize the

whole foot in these patients.

Procedure

Patients sit or recline on an ergonomically designed

chair, positioned so that the appropriate limb is

comfortably resting inside the bore of the extremity MR

scanner. Patients find the extremity MR scanner less

intimidating than a conventional MR scan because the

experience is not claustrophobic and the scanner is

relatively quiet. This sense of comfort helps patients

remain still and reduces problems due to motion

artifact. Therefore, it could be excellent for pediatric

patients. Scan duration is 30-35 minutes.

Missing link found

This is Very cool stuff for the scientific community

 

Today, at the American Museum of Natural Historyin New York, a revolutionary discovery — one that will stand as a milestone for paleontologists and evolutionists everywhere — was announced. Scientists based at the University of Oslo have discovered “Ida,” also known as Darwinius masillae, a 47-million-year-old fossil that has been proclaimed the “missing link” in connecting human skeletal structure to early mammals.

Scientists found Ida in Messel Pit, Germany and soon found out that she is about twenty times older than most fossils related to human evolution. What makes Ida so special is that despite her classification as an early prosimian (lemurs), she has certain undeniable human characteristics such as forward facing eyes and even an opposable thumb.

This is an exciting and validating day for scientists everywhere. Broadcaster and naturalist Sir David Attenborough has said: “This little creature is going to show us our connection with all the rest of the mammals.”

Head on over to The Link for pictures, video and more information about Ida and the team of researchers behind her. Also don’t miss what’s up at the open source journal PLoS One to read about the scientists’ findings.

 

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Doctor Rob Carson saves Nicholas Rossi’s life by drilling into his brain

A COUNTRY doctor has saved the life of a dying 12-year-old boy by using a household drill to bore into his brain after the boy had a bike accident. 

The emergency “operation”, by local GP Rob Carson in the Victorian country town of Maryborough, was yesterday hailed by a leading neurosurgeon as “one of the gutsiest life-saving efforts imaginable”. 

The drama happened late last Friday when Nicholas Rossi fell off his bike while riding in a quiet cul de sac outside a friend’s house.

Nicholas was not wearing a helmet and the impact of his head hitting the pavement knocked him momentarily unconscious. 

“He was a bit delirious at first, but then he stood up and said he was fine,” his father, Michael Rossi, told The Australian yesterday. When he got home, Nicholas kept complaining of a headache and his mother, Karen, a trained nurse, took him to the district hospital where Dr Carson, a local GP, was on duty. 

The doctor kept him for observation, but an hour later Nicholas began to drift in and out of consciousness and have spasms. 

Dr Carson recognised it as a sign of internal bleeding in the skull that places acute pressure on the brain – the same deadly condition that recently claimed the life of actress Natasha Richardson, wife of Hollywood actor Liam Neeson. He also noticed that one of the boy’s pupils was larger than the other – another sign of the internal bleeding. 

The boy had fractured his skull and torn a tiny artery between the bone and the brain just above his ear. This created internal bleeding that became trapped between his skull and brain and formed into a huge blood clot, placing pressure on the brain. 

If Dr Carson did not act within minutes, the boy would die. 

“Dr Carson came over to us and said, ‘I am going to have to drill into (Nicholas) to relieve the pressure on the brain – we’ve got one shot at this and one shot only’,” Mr Rossi recalled. 

The small hospital was not equipped with neurological drills, so Dr Carson obtained a household De Walt drill, used for boring holes in wood, from a hospital maintenance room. 

He telephoned leading Melbourne neurosurgeon David Wallace to help talk him through the procedure, which he had never tried before. 

“He drilled into my son’s head and we heard the suction,” Mr Rossi said. 

Dr Carson drilled until a blood clot fell out and continued to treat Nicholas until he could be airlifted an hour later to Melbourne’s Royal Children’s Hospital.

 

“If you are in that situation you just do those things,” he said. 

“It is not a personal achievement, it is just a part of the job and I had a very good team of people helping me.”

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